Peer Review – some lessons learned & some friendly advice – Learning Rush

After I recently attended a MOOC in which peer-review was very poor (reasons in short: wording in criteria was very strict so student assessed each other too bad and people repeatedly failed; students did not leave comments just grades, not enough students for peer review (!!- it was supposed to be a MOOC!)), I was wondering about the high and lows of peer review. Actually, I am convinced that it is one of the most valuable tools in online learning.

Why (for me) only online learning? Clare Gormely mentions it at the end of her blog post Peer Review – some lessons learned & some friendly advice – Learning Rush. Because it’s hard to assess friends.  Continue reading „Peer Review – some lessons learned & some friendly advice – Learning Rush“

Adaptive Learning for everyone?

I like the idea of Adaptive Learning. And after reading this article about Adaptive Learning in Compliance Training, I am sure thousands of employees will like it too.

Adaptive learning is a computer-based and/or online educational system that modifies the presentation of material in response to student performance.

This definition by Dreambox, a provider of an adaptive learning platform, very much nails it down. You first assess the students knowledge and then only give him the content he needs to fill his knowledge gaps. This saves time and enhances motivation. Both factors that are also extremely important in business environments with mandatory corporate training such as compliance training.

Although it sounds great, it’s not so easy to implement. Some schools or companies may be able to spend money on a platform that sophistically tests and then guides the learner through his very personal learning path. But most will not. Still, they may adapt some features of adaptive learning into their own learning management system, presupposed their learning is modular.

At the beginning, learners can be assessed through a quiz reflecting different levels of knowledge in different aspects of the content that has to be learned. What then on sophisticated learning platform the machine is doing, can also be done by a human being- telling the student that, based on his performance in the test, he has to learn these modules while he is allowed to skip others. Of course you don’t want to do this for a thousand students, but in smaller settings, it is doable, effective and motivating. You may even implement interim tests to adjust the mandatory modules, or you just finish with one big assessment.

In any case, this strategy can be applied in any LMS as long as the learning content is designed modular and you have a lecturer creating good quizzes and willing to do the additional work of assessing the initial student assessments. I am sure, it will pay out by having motivated and successful students!

Picture from Wikipedia