Peer Review – some lessons learned & some friendly advice – Learning Rush

After I recently attended a MOOC in which peer-review was very poor (reasons in short: wording in criteria was very strict so student assessed each other too bad and people repeatedly failed; students did not leave comments just grades, not enough students for peer review (!!- it was supposed to be a MOOC!)), I was wondering about the high and lows of peer review. Actually, I am convinced that it is one of the most valuable tools in online learning.

Why (for me) only online learning? Clare Gormely mentions it at the end of her blog post Peer Review – some lessons learned & some friendly advice – Learning Rush. Because it’s hard to assess friends. more…

Just a scoop: Two cool recommendations for H5P libraries for Moodle

As I am currently working on a Moodle project, I am reading quiet a bit about user cases, design possibilities and extensions. Thereby I stumbled upon an article in elearningsindustry.com about H5P libraries. They integrate into Moodle as activities and offer additional features.

The article points out 5 libraries that can be helpful especially with adult learners- so my learners. I let you read it and judge by yourself, but these are the two features I liked most:

I love the Hot Spots! When working with visuals, it’s a great possibilities to even enhance engagement and learning by letting the student click on a spot put into an image or visual for further information.

I also like the video library that allows implementation of questions right into the video. They used it in a MOOC I attended a while ago, and it helps to keep up the attention and to reflect on what was just said.
Articles I read and like are regularly posted on my scoop.it page.

Why Microlearning Drives Over 20% More Information Retention Than Long-Form Training

Overall, across the three scoring measures in the study, fine-grained performed 22.2% better than the blocked group and 8.4% better than the medium-grained group. The fine-grained group, with their “micro” content and frequent assessment questions, fared better than both competing groups in every category. From this study, it would appear that bite-sized content is, indeed, better.

The researchers mentioned two dynamics potentially in effect. First, the larger amount of material and questions given to the blocked group might have “put greater demands on learners,” resulting in them having to do more work to “access necessary information from their memory.” In other words, stockpiling information slowed down the process of retrieving it. Sounds familiar.

Second, the blocked group could have suffered from having less feedback than the medium and fine groups: “Longer study phases without learning questions may lead to uncertainty about whether they have understood all relevant content or not.”

Bingo.

via Report: Microlearning Is 22% Better Than Long-Form Training